Fantasia No. 3 in D minor, K. 397/385g (Fantasy in English, Fantasie in German)

A piece of music for solo piano composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1782. Despite being unfinished at Mozart's death, the piece is nonetheless one of his more popular compositions for the piano.  The original manuscript has not survived and the final measures of the piece have been lost. The ending as it currently exists is believed to have been written by August Eberhard Müller, one of the composer's admirers.  The Fantasia runs to just over 100 measures, in a single multi-tempo movement marked Andante – Adagio – Presto – Tempo primo – Presto – Tempo primo – Allegretto, and a full performance takes approximately five minutes.

Piano Sonata in C Major, K330

FIRST MOVEMENT   This Sonata is in many respects a total contrast to the preceding work, with no trace of melancholy except for the sadness expressed in the middle section of the Andante. The first movement is exuberantly happy.

SECOND MOVEMENT   It is followed by an intimate Andante cantabile movement with a beautifully expressive minor episode and some fine contrapuntal part-writing in the episode’s A flat section. The numerous phrase marks and the careful dynamic indications testify to Mozart’s own fondness of his Sonata. By the way, the last four measures of this middle movement are not in the autograph – Mozart added them when the Sonata was given to the engraver. What a blissful afterthought!

THIRD MOVEMENT   This Andante is followed by a cheerful, sturdy final movement in sonata form marked Allegretto. Its development starts with a new folk-like theme under which one could easily put the joking text from a Viennese folksong: “Unsre Katz hat Junge kriegt…”

Piano Sonata in B Flat, K. 333

FIRST MOVEMENT   This Sonata takes us into new realms of lyricism – we suppose that this is inherent in Mozart’s choice of key. The first movement opens with a cantabile theme which no one else could have written. It should be noted that measures 3 4 (with upbeat) are a variation of the initial phrase. A minor Italian composer might have repeated the opening statement one step lower; it still would sound well, but it would not be comparable in any way to the beauty of Mozart’s theme. The wealth of melodic and thematic inventions here and in the rest of the Sonata is simply staggering. How simple, in comparison, is Beethoven’s structure in his Sonata in the same key of B-flat, op. 22! In this Sonata Mozart anticipates in more than one way the “heavenly length” of some of Schubert’s Sonatas.

SECOND MOVEMENT   According to Daniel Schubart’s aesthetic theory, E flat, the key of the middle movement, was the key “of love, prayer, intimate converse with the Almighty, signifying the Trinity with its three flats”- a characterization which does seem to apply, for once, to this rather solemn and profound Andante cantabile movement. It is in sonata form, and sometimes gives the impression of having been conceived as a string trio. One of the boldest moments is the beginning of the development with its biting dissonances, all the more telling after the preceding euphony.

THIRD MOVEMENT   The somber ethos of E flat is dispelled by a concertante Rondo finale in B flat, although this good-humoured movement does retain a touch of seriousness – a sufficiently weighty conclusion to this fine Sonata. Several features – not least the tutti entry preceding the cadenza (m. 168) – suggest that this is a concerto movement in disguise. The insertion of a full-scale cadenza (m. 171) into a piano sonata movement is most striking, and this powerful one is only rivaled in Mozart’s Concertos. It far surpasses those in Haydn’s and C.P.E. Bach’s Sonatas. 

Piano Sonata in C major, K545

Mozart called his Sonata K 545 “Eine kleine Klavier-Sonate für Anfänger” (A little clavier sonata for beginners) when he entered the theme in the catalogue of his works on June 26, 1788. The Sonata is usually known as the Sonata facile, and it is considered easy to play, ideal for teaching purposes. While this is true, we must bear in mind that Mozart, like Bach and Schumann, maintained the highest standards when writing for students. The third movement, a Rondo, is perhaps the most child-like movement, and the innocently graceful G major Andante is based on a resourceful use of Alberti patterns. Despite its apparent simplicity this movement shows a surprising depth of emotion, especially in the second episode which turns into the minor key.