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classical pianist


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classical pianist


I work during the day as an engineer speaking mostly in acronyms while keeping the world's financial systems connected through various intricate technologies.  When I’m not routing ones and zeros around the globe I strive to be a pianist.  I started studying music as an adult in the summer of 2004.  After having attended a symposium for pianists at Princeton University I met the person who would ultimately become my teacher. 

I spend as much of my free time as possible learning new repertoire and perfecting my technique.

Explore this site and learn more about the music, listen to some samples, check out some photography, or watch videos of me performing pieces from the baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary solo piano repertoire.

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Currently learning


Currently learning


Franz Schubert, Impromptu No. 3 in G-flat major, D. 899 (Op. 90)

In 1827 Franz Schubert wrote eight solo piano pieces called impromptus. An impromptu is a musical work, usually for a solo instrument, that embodies the spirit of improvisation. The first thing listeners notice about Op. 90 No. 3 is its incredible lyricism. Long, melodic lines sing over an arpeggiated accompaniment (reminiscent of a harp), creating an interesting rhythmic juxtaposition. The theme develops into a shadowy, dark middle section where the harmonies modulate constantly and the tension builds before returning to the reflective opening mood. This serenade is a classic example of Schubert's outstanding lyrical facility, as well as his penchant for long melodic lines. There is little interruption in the fluttering harp-like broken triad accompaniment, creating a tense contrast with the spacious and languid melody—an anticipation of Felix Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words. With no repeats, the melody develops into a shadowy and frequently modulating middle section before returning to its relaxed flow. Schubert composed this work the year before he died.

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Planned Next Piece


Planned Next Piece


Ludwig van Beethoven, Bagatelle No. 2 in C Major, Op. 33

The term bagatelle is of French or Italian origin and means something of little value, a trifle, and was first used as early as 1717 by the French Baroque composer François Couperin.  Beethoven wrote three sets of bagatelles, a total of 24 with opus numbers as well as an additional 6 individual bagatelles without opus numbers.  One of the without opus number bagatelles is arguably one of Beethoven's most well known pieces, Für Elise.  His first set of bagatelles opus 33, was written in 1802-1803 and contains seven works.  It would be a mistake to take the term bagatelle literally.  These are short pieces, but they aren't all fluff and stuff.

This scherzo is in C major and begins with a rhythmically quirky figure.  With sudden changes in dynamics, a mix of slurred notes and staccato notes and rests, Beethoven trips the ear as we try to grasp the pulse of the music.  This first section is repeated, and just as the listener is beginning to get the feel of the rhythm Beethoven changes things abruptly with a section in A minor that has the melody played in octaves in the right hand to a triplet accompaniment.  Like a swelling ocean wave a crescendo from piano to fortissimo spans a 3-bar section, and rapidly dies down to piano, only to do it again before the end of the minor section.  The minor section is repeated, and the opening scherzo returns.  The trio is of a more mellow mood, as runs of thirds in the right hand spell out the simple theme.  The trio repeats, after which the scherzo returns but with some syncopation thrown in for good measure.  A short coda begins to wind down the music, but the final bars hammer out a C major chord in the right hand alternating with a low C in the left.  The accents shift for a few bars until the music ends on the low C in the second beat of a measure.

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