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Amateur Pianist


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Amateur Pianist


Louis wants to live in a world where exercise comes in pill form and there are no consequences for binge eating sweets.  Outside of that fantasy he works during the day speaking mostly in acronyms while keeping the world connected through various intricate technologies.

When he’s not routing ones and zeros around the globe he strives to be a pianist.  He started studying music as an adult in the summer of 2004.  After having attended a symposium for pianists at Princeton University he met the person who would ultimately become his teacher.  Louis spends as much free time as possible learning new repertoire and perfecting his technique.  

Explore this site and learn more about the music, check out some photography, or watch videos of Louis performing pieces from the baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary solo piano repertoire.

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Currently learning


Currently learning


Gretchen am Spinnrade (Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel), D118 Op. 2 Franz Schubert (transcribed by Franz Liszt S.558/8)


Liszt transcribed many Schubert songs, and this collection of twelve is one of his more successful efforts. He instructed that pianists who play them be aware of the song texts and also requested of his publishers that the words be given with each corresponding work. To him, proper interpretation was not possible if the individual pieces were approached as an end unto themselves. It should be noted that while the themes and harmonies are mostly Schubert's, the writing is Liszt's: in the process of transcribing, he did take some liberties, adding octaves, arpeggios and other pianistic touches in some instances, but generally to good effect.  The eighth piece Gretchen am Spinnrade ("Gretchen at the Spinning-Wheel"), from Goethe's Faust, is full of tension and yearning, Gretchen longing for her lover Faust. Liszt conveys the obsessive rhythm of the spinning-wheel effectively, adroitly underpinning the powerful emotions of the piece.

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Planned Next Piece


Planned Next Piece


 

Frédéric Chopin, Nocturne in C minor Op. 48 No. 1

The melody of the Nocturne in C minor unfolds lento and mezzo voce (slowly and half-voice). The opening notes do not flow, but fall – amid rests – like words of existential weight. Tadeusz Zieliński aptly opines that the melody of the Nocturne ‘sounds like a lofty, inspired song filled with the gravity of its message, genuine pathos and a tragic majesty’. With every bar, the melody moves closer to the point of culmination, before plummeting downwards in a tense, expressively rhapsodic recitative and immersing itself in the contemplative sounds of a chorale. The chorale grows in strength, despite the fact that the violent music of double octaves forces its way in between its chords. André Gide called this moment ‘the sudden irruption of wind-blasts’. For the reprise of the opening theme, Gide found the following description: ‘a triumph of the spiritual element over the elements unleashed at the beginning’.  There is indeed something uniquely grand in the way the form here masters the emotions, which are packed with sound.

Kleczyński heard in this music ‘the soul’s disquietude’.  Marceli Antoni Szulc had the impression that ‘this magnificent hymn is proclaimed not by a feeble piano, but by a mighty organ – midst the sound of trombones and kettle drums’.  Ferdynand Hoesick recalled that the C minor Nocturne in Paderewski’s rendition gave the impression of a true ‘eroica’ among Chopin’s nocturnes.

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