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classical pianist


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classical pianist


I work during the day as an engineer speaking mostly in acronyms while keeping the world's financial systems connected through various intricate technologies.  When I’m not routing ones and zeros around the globe I strive to be a pianist.  I started studying music as an adult in the summer of 2004.  After having attended a symposium for pianists at Princeton University I met the person who would ultimately become my teacher. 

I spend as much of my free time as possible learning new repertoire and perfecting my technique.

Explore this site and learn more about the music, listen to some samples, check out some photography, or watch videos of me performing pieces from the baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary solo piano repertoire.

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Currently learning


Currently learning


Franz Schubert transcribed by Franz Liszt, Auf dem Wasser zu singen (To sing on the water)

This lied was composed by Franz Schubert in 1823, based on the poem of the same name by Friedrich Leopold zu Stolberg-Stolberg.

The text describes a scene on the water from the perspective of the narrator who is in a boat, and delves into the narrator's reflections on the passing of time. The song's piano accompaniment recreates the texture of the shimmering waves (der Freude sanftschimmernden Wellen) mentioned in the third line of the poem and its rhythmic style in the 6/8 meter is reminiscent of a barcarole. Harmonically, the song as a whole and within each stanza traces a movement from the minor mode to the major mode: the song begins in A-flat minor and ends in A-flat major.

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Planned Next Piece


Planned Next Piece


Johann Sebastian Bach Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004: Chaconne Transcribed by Ferruccio Busoni

JS Bach’s employment at the Cöthen court in the late 1710s and early 1720s coincided with one of his most fruitful creative periods. Many of his finest string compositions date from this time, including the Six Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin. The D minor Partita’s concluding Chaconne has long stood as one of the instrument’s longest, most iconic, most challenging and most fulfilling unaccompanied works. The composer constructs 64 variations on a basic four-bar theme, which commence in accordance with the theme’s stern stateliness, yet grow more technically complex and emotionally varied as they unfold.

In a letter to Clara Schumann, Brahms famously described the music as ‘a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind. If one doesn’t have the greatest violinist around, then it is well the most beautiful pleasure to simply listen to its sound in one’s mind.’ Indeed, Brahms made a piano left hand arrangement of the Chaconne which continues to find favour today. Ferruccio Busoni’s piano transcription, however, has held forth in the repertoire for more than a century. It requires not just a pair of busy and accomplished hands, but also a level of artistry that can fuse architectural savvy, sustaining power and poetic introspection.

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Stay Updated